Monday, March 24, 2014

Accepting the Mystery of Light

Photo by Bethany Buchanan
God is light. 

What an appropriate metaphor. 

Light brings energy, warmth, and life. It is not only visible itself, but it also reveals the world to us by making all else visible, both the beautiful elements and the grim.  

But although light reveals our physical world, we know that only certain wavelengths of light are visible to the human eye, meaning that much of the spectrum goes unappreciated by us. 

There is much more to the nature of light than we can see. 

The human appreciation of light is limited.

However, just because we can't see the entire spectrum of light doesn't mean that we can't see some of it; and only seeing some of it doesn't stop us from taking advantage of its benefits.

I recently spoke to someone about the Gospel.

"I don't pretend to understand all that," he said.

All that, he called it. Goodness. 

But, honestly, he makes a good point. Who actually does understand the Gospel? 

In a way, it's simple enough to grasp. Even a child can understand that the Gospel works and can exercise faith to believe. In another sense, the fullness of the Gospel is unfathomable, and certain aspects of how it works have been debated by theologians down through the centuries with little resulting clarification. 

But just because we can't understand all aspects of how the Gospel works doesn't mean that we can't understand some of it; and only understanding some of it doesn't stop us from taking advantage of its benefits.


Remember, God is light. 

And we don't really understand light.

No one does. Not really.


Did you know that scientists can't even agree on the nature of what light actually is? Sometimes it acts like a particle, and sometimes it acts like a wave. Right now light is classified as a form of energy, but great minds such as Max Planck and Albert Einstein have shown evidence to suggest that light particles have real existence, meaning that light may actually be matter. So what is light, really? Is it matter or is it energy? 

We know light, and yet we don't know. We experience light without fully understanding what it is, and yet not understanding it fully hasn't kept us from enjoying the benefits of its existence.

God is light.  

Yes, what an appropriate metaphor.

We know God, and yet we don't know. We've experienced him without fully understanding who he is, and yet not understanding him fully hasn't kept us from enjoying the full benefits of his presence.

Now this is the message we have heard from Him and declare to you: God is light, and there is absolutely no darkness in Him. If we say, “We have fellowship with Him,” yet we walk in darkness, we are lying and are not practicing the truth. But if we walk in the light as He Himself is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus His Son cleanses us from all sin. 1 John 1:5-7 (HCSB)

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